ALISON CROCETTA Advanced Sculpture
Chelsea Bornheim

I like to work with all materials, but tend to gravitate towards materials that are more easily worked by hand, because they give me a greater sense of control over the form. Since I draw inspiration from my materials, the process with which I work these materials is also of great importance to me. I love the idea that with a single raw material you can get an infinite amount of results depending on the process you follow. In my current piece, involving wood and plaster, I am exploring the evidence of the artist’s hand in the process of making by leaving any cracks or chips in the plaster unfinished, like a storyline of every mistake and mishap during the making.

ALISON CROCETTA Advanced Sculpture
Chelsea Bornheim

I like to work with all materials, but tend to gravitate towards materials that are more easily worked by hand, because they give me a greater sense of control over the form. Since I draw inspiration from my materials, the process with which I work these materials is also of great importance to me. I love the idea that with a single raw material you can get an infinite amount of results depending on the process you follow. In my current piece, involving wood and plaster, I am exploring the evidence of the artist’s hand in the process of making by leaving any cracks or chips in the plaster unfinished, like a storyline of every mistake and mishap during the making.
ALISON CROCETTA Advanced Sculpture
Chelsea Bornheim

I like to work with all materials, but tend to gravitate towards materials that are more easily worked by hand, because they give me a greater sense of control over the form. Since I draw inspiration from my materials, the process with which I work these materials is also of great importance to me. I love the idea that with a single raw material you can get an infinite amount of results depending on the process you follow. In my current piece, involving wood and plaster, I am exploring the evidence of the artist’s hand in the process of making by leaving any cracks or chips in the plaster unfinished, like a storyline of every mistake and mishap during the making.
ALISON CROCETTA Advanced Sculpture
Erica Slone

In my work, I reconstruct my personal experiences as an investigation of social, political and religious power structures. Engaging subjects such as the Iraq war, military culture, veterans’ care, gay and women’s rights, my work combines both familiar visual representations and a personal vocabulary of symbols, into multi-layered pieces.

In recent projects, I’ve been investigating the military’s misogynistic culture and military sexual trauma through creating compositions around bedding. Bearings/Bareness is a standard inter-spring mattress dressed in a pleated, olive drab wool blanket on top of a tight, white sheet with hospital corners erected from the center of a sandbag enclosure wall called a military defensive fighting position (DFP). I have cut a large, vertical tear into the backside of the mattress from which the springs violently emerge and wrap out and around to secure placement of the blankets. In this piece I’ve used obsessive repetition to express the orderliness and rigidity of military culture, and have interdependently connected the rigid orderliness to its opposite side of chaotic unraveling.

Honor Vessel (Atonement) is comprised of nylon America flags cut and sewn into a long, sand-filled tube coiled into a vessel that rests upon an older, handcrafted wooden stand. The inside of the vessel is painted with pine tar and filled with feathers. In this piece I am addressing the uneasy and confused relationship between religion (specifically Christianity) and nationalism in the United States.
ALISON CROCETTA Advanced Sculpture
Erica Slone

In my work, I reconstruct my personal experiences as an investigation of social, political and religious power structures. Engaging subjects such as the Iraq war, military culture, veterans’ care, gay and women’s rights, my work combines both familiar visual representations and a personal vocabulary of symbols, into multi-layered pieces.

In recent projects, I’ve been investigating the military’s misogynistic culture and military sexual trauma through creating compositions around bedding. Bearings/Bareness is a standard inter-spring mattress dressed in a pleated, olive drab wool blanket on top of a tight, white sheet with hospital corners erected from the center of a sandbag enclosure wall called a military defensive fighting position (DFP). I have cut a large, vertical tear into the backside of the mattress from which the springs violently emerge and wrap out and around to secure placement of the blankets. In this piece I’ve used obsessive repetition to express the orderliness and rigidity of military culture, and have interdependently connected the rigid orderliness to its opposite side of chaotic unraveling.

Honor Vessel (Atonement) is comprised of nylon America flags cut and sewn into a long, sand-filled tube coiled into a vessel that rests upon an older, handcrafted wooden stand. The inside of the vessel is painted with pine tar and filled with feathers. In this piece I am addressing the uneasy and confused relationship between religion (specifically Christianity) and nationalism in the United States.
ALISON CROCETTA Advanced Sculpture
Erica Slone

In my work, I reconstruct my personal experiences as an investigation of social, political and religious power structures. Engaging subjects such as the Iraq war, military culture, veterans’ care, gay and women’s rights, my work combines both familiar visual representations and a personal vocabulary of symbols, into multi-layered pieces.

In recent projects, I’ve been investigating the military’s misogynistic culture and military sexual trauma through creating compositions around bedding. Bearings/Bareness is a standard inter-spring mattress dressed in a pleated, olive drab wool blanket on top of a tight, white sheet with hospital corners erected from the center of a sandbag enclosure wall called a military defensive fighting position (DFP). I have cut a large, vertical tear into the backside of the mattress from which the springs violently emerge and wrap out and around to secure placement of the blankets. In this piece I’ve used obsessive repetition to express the orderliness and rigidity of military culture, and have interdependently connected the rigid orderliness to its opposite side of chaotic unraveling.

Honor Vessel (Atonement) is comprised of nylon America flags cut and sewn into a long, sand-filled tube coiled into a vessel that rests upon an older, handcrafted wooden stand. The inside of the vessel is painted with pine tar and filled with feathers. In this piece I am addressing the uneasy and confused relationship between religion (specifically Christianity) and nationalism in the United States.
ALISON CROCETTA Advanced Sculpture
Makenzie Frank

The thin line that exists between painting and sculpture has been something that I have subconsciously been hovering over for quite some time. In my work I am exploring just how far I can push that line with small and large scale “sculptural paintings”. The source and inspiration for my work is drawn from the “after effects” of recent life events and have resulted in what I consider to be “Emotional Landscapes”. Processing through depression, difficult family situations, my faith and long-term medical conditions provides the fodder for my recent works.

Experimentation for the landscapes environments started with small 18x24 canvases. I try not to limit myself to material, and therefore had variety of things on hand to use. Most of the materials used were objects that I had kept and refused to throw away and others were found objects that others consider trash. Some of these were: old journal pages, tree bark, water and acrylic paint, tea, plaster and an assortment of other things. Each of the works has many layers of texture and objects that personally reflect the complexity of the situations that first inspired them.
ALISON CROCETTA Advanced Sculpture
Makenzie Frank

The thin line that exists between painting and sculpture has been something that I have subconsciously been hovering over for quite some time. In my work I am exploring just how far I can push that line with small and large scale “sculptural paintings”. The source and inspiration for my work is drawn from the “after effects” of recent life events and have resulted in what I consider to be “Emotional Landscapes”. Processing through depression, difficult family situations, my faith and long-term medical conditions provides the fodder for my recent works.

Experimentation for the landscapes environments started with small 18x24 canvases. I try not to limit myself to material, and therefore had variety of things on hand to use. Most of the materials used were objects that I had kept and refused to throw away and others were found objects that others consider trash. Some of these were: old journal pages, tree bark, water and acrylic paint, tea, plaster and an assortment of other things. Each of the works has many layers of texture and objects that personally reflect the complexity of the situations that first inspired them.
ALISON CROCETTA Advanced Sculpture
Makenzie Frank

The thin line that exists between painting and sculpture has been something that I have subconsciously been hovering over for quite some time. In my work I am exploring just how far I can push that line with small and large scale “sculptural paintings”. The source and inspiration for my work is drawn from the “after effects” of recent life events and have resulted in what I consider to be “Emotional Landscapes”. Processing through depression, difficult family situations, my faith and long-term medical conditions provides the fodder for my recent works.

Experimentation for the landscapes environments started with small 18x24 canvases. I try not to limit myself to material, and therefore had variety of things on hand to use. Most of the materials used were objects that I had kept and refused to throw away and others were found objects that others consider trash. Some of these were: old journal pages, tree bark, water and acrylic paint, tea, plaster and an assortment of other things. Each of the works has many layers of texture and objects that personally reflect the complexity of the situations that first inspired them.
ALISON CROCETTA Advanced Sculpture
Tessa Stamm

The material body of my recent work has been the physical remnants of my undergraduate career. The initial inquiries were content related, what is/was my undergraduate career composed of in terms of information. The books, articles, handouts, and lectures I read and listened to have been termed “input”, the information I was exposed to during enrollment at OSU. Out of this investigation came a bibliography of the “input”. The complete bibliography, an accessible and familiar format, can be seen as the skeleton of my undergraduate education and also a key to it. I added to the bibliography my “output”, which consists of all the assignments I completed while enrolled such as papers, projects, and presentations. The added output makes the bibliography appear more as testament to my learning than examination of it as a whole.

My frustration with trying to understand my need to examine my undergraduate education made me want to destroy it. I understood that this would free me of the attachment I had formed to the content and allow me to explore my personal fascinations and interpretations rather than the constituent, formal details. Considering my options of cutting, tearing, pulping, burning, none appealed so much as the idea of chewing. It is a simultaneously vicious and nourishing act; violent in that it is destructive and nourishing in that we chew/eat to nourish ourselves.

Chewing the papers created beautiful pupa-like forms which was pleasantly unexpected. The best approach to presenting these chewed forms presented itself when I laid them out to dry on the floor, evenly space in horizontal lines. This layout highlighted the individual labor of chewing and also the beauty of the forms created by the chewing.
ALISON CROCETTA Advanced Sculpture
Tessa Stamm

The material body of my recent work has been the physical remnants of my undergraduate career. The initial inquiries were content related, what is/was my undergraduate career composed of in terms of information. The books, articles, handouts, and lectures I read and listened to have been termed “input”, the information I was exposed to during enrollment at OSU. Out of this investigation came a bibliography of the “input”. The complete bibliography, an accessible and familiar format, can be seen as the skeleton of my undergraduate education and also a key to it. I added to the bibliography my “output”, which consists of all the assignments I completed while enrolled such as papers, projects, and presentations. The added output makes the bibliography appear more as testament to my learning than examination of it as a whole.

My frustration with trying to understand my need to examine my undergraduate education made me want to destroy it. I understood that this would free me of the attachment I had formed to the content and allow me to explore my personal fascinations and interpretations rather than the constituent, formal details. Considering my options of cutting, tearing, pulping, burning, none appealed so much as the idea of chewing. It is a simultaneously vicious and nourishing act; violent in that it is destructive and nourishing in that we chew/eat to nourish ourselves.

Chewing the papers created beautiful pupa-like forms which was pleasantly unexpected. The best approach to presenting these chewed forms presented itself when I laid them out to dry on the floor, evenly space in horizontal lines. This layout highlighted the individual labor of chewing and also the beauty of the forms created by the chewing.
ALISON CROCETTA Advanced Sculpture
Tessa Stamm

The material body of my recent work has been the physical remnants of my undergraduate career. The initial inquiries were content related, what is/was my undergraduate career composed of in terms of information. The books, articles, handouts, and lectures I read and listened to have been termed “input”, the information I was exposed to during enrollment at OSU. Out of this investigation came a bibliography of the “input”. The complete bibliography, an accessible and familiar format, can be seen as the skeleton of my undergraduate education and also a key to it. I added to the bibliography my “output”, which consists of all the assignments I completed while enrolled such as papers, projects, and presentations. The added output makes the bibliography appear more as testament to my learning than examination of it as a whole.

My frustration with trying to understand my need to examine my undergraduate education made me want to destroy it. I understood that this would free me of the attachment I had formed to the content and allow me to explore my personal fascinations and interpretations rather than the constituent, formal details. Considering my options of cutting, tearing, pulping, burning, none appealed so much as the idea of chewing. It is a simultaneously vicious and nourishing act; violent in that it is destructive and nourishing in that we chew/eat to nourish ourselves.

Chewing the papers created beautiful pupa-like forms which was pleasantly unexpected. The best approach to presenting these chewed forms presented itself when I laid them out to dry on the floor, evenly space in horizontal lines. This layout highlighted the individual labor of chewing and also the beauty of the forms created by the chewing.
ALISON CROCETTA Advanced Sculpture


The material body of my recent work has been the physical remnants of my undergraduate career. The initial inquiries were content related, what is/was my undergraduate career composed of in terms of information. The books, articles, handouts, and lectures I read and listened to have been termed “input”, the information I was exposed to during enrollment at OSU. Out of this investigation came a bibliography of the “input”. The complete bibliography, an accessible and familiar format, can be seen as the skeleton of my undergraduate education and also a key to it. I added to the bibliography my “output”, which consists of all the assignments I completed while enrolled such as papers, projects, and presentations. The added output makes the bibliography appear more as testament to my learning than examination of it as a whole.

My frustration with trying to understand my need to examine my undergraduate education made me want to destroy it. I understood that this would free me of the attachment I had formed to the content and allow me to explore my personal fascinations and interpretations rather than the constituent, formal details. Considering my options of cutting, tearing, pulping, burning, none appealed so much as the idea of chewing. It is a simultaneously vicious and nourishing act; violent in that it is destructive and nourishing in that we chew/eat to nourish ourselves.

Chewing the papers created beautiful pupa-like forms which was pleasantly unexpected. The best approach to presenting these chewed forms presented itself when I laid them out to dry on the floor, evenly space in horizontal lines. This layout highlighted the individual labor of chewing and also the beauty of the forms created by the chewing.
ALISON CROCETTA Advanced Sculpture
Tessa Stamm

The material body of my recent work has been the physical remnants of my undergraduate career. The initial inquiries were content related, what is/was my undergraduate career composed of in terms of information. The books, articles, handouts, and lectures I read and listened to have been termed “input”, the information I was exposed to during enrollment at OSU. Out of this investigation came a bibliography of the “input”. The complete bibliography, an accessible and familiar format, can be seen as the skeleton of my undergraduate education and also a key to it. I added to the bibliography my “output”, which consists of all the assignments I completed while enrolled such as papers, projects, and presentations. The added output makes the bibliography appear more as testament to my learning than examination of it as a whole.

My frustration with trying to understand my need to examine my undergraduate education made me want to destroy it. I understood that this would free me of the attachment I had formed to the content and allow me to explore my personal fascinations and interpretations rather than the constituent, formal details. Considering my options of cutting, tearing, pulping, burning, none appealed so much as the idea of chewing. It is a simultaneously vicious and nourishing act; violent in that it is destructive and nourishing in that we chew/eat to nourish ourselves.

Chewing the papers created beautiful pupa-like forms which was pleasantly unexpected. The best approach to presenting these chewed forms presented itself when I laid them out to dry on the floor, evenly space in horizontal lines. This layout highlighted the individual labor of chewing and also the beauty of the forms created by the chewing.
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